Memory Book

Time Was

   

 

 


                                      ― Buddy Holly, 1958  


 ― The Four Lads, 1955

 
This page presents 85 accounts by class members of some of their favorite personal memories from the time we were together as kids in OceansideMemories that "light the corners of our minds ― misty, water-colored memories of the way we were." Many are fuzzy and fragmented after more than 55 years. Others are complete and crystal clear. Most are sweet. Some are not.  

Many of the following reminiscences of our classmates were posted on an online message board during 1999 or 2000. If you send in yours by e-mail, this page should continue to grow over time. So keep coming back for more  and share the joy and the laughter.

The recording you are hearing was made in 1958 but never released. Can you guess who made it? Click here for the answer.

[Missing photos can be found by clicking the links to the pages of "Yearbook Online."]
         

   
   

 

Ginny Beedenbender: We were awful to Mr. Korn, but he seemed to invite the pranks and fun poked at — the "torture" that was brought upon him. He really was nice in a strange kind of way. He used to wear those rumpled suits and stained ties!! I actually looked forward to English class — it was kind of fun, sort of a fun-break in my day!
  

   

Kathy Cullen:  Mr. Korn always had that blank look. He was really a nice, kind man, and we took such advantage of him. We were so bad.

We skated at Loft's Lake. That was really good. A little scary. We use to sneak up to the house and peek in. Those poor people!! What about drag racing in "OIL CITY"?????????  That was almost like the movie "Grease."  

I took violin lessons in jr. high. We had to put a hanky under the violin so as not to irritate our delicate clavicles. Such ladies! I don't think I ever saw the teacher laugh. It could have been my playing. 

   

Nancy Keegan:  I, like Kathy [Cullen], took violin. Kathy [Nancy's now late sister] took clarinet. We were all so musical. Our careers ended when my sister, Kathy, hit me with her clarinet, so I broke my violin over her head. All Over!!

Response to above by big sister, Carol Keegan ('57):  It was just tons of fun living in that house with Nancy and Kathy practicing and fighting with their clarinet and violin. They would actually duel, Nancy using her violin bow.

I remember Jahn's — the "Kitchen Sink."  It was enough for ten people, and if you finished it you got one free.  Only one person had to eat the whole thing to get one free!!   I didn't, but my father was leader of an explorer troop, and he would take the troop there after the parade every Memorial Day.  He would send in Bill Seaman (I think Bill graduated O'side in '61 or '62), and Bill would eat the whole thing.  Then the rest of the troop would go in and get a free one.  However, poor Bill would end up at my house throwing up.  

Who remembers "Shors" on Sunrise highway in RVC??  We'd go there after the pep rallies, after the games, or on Sunday mornings. Kathy Cullen and Michelle Calderio would show up at my house Sunday mornings in their "going to meetin' clothes," with their "collection money," and we would all go to Shors and eat!!  We called my house "St. Keegans." After a pep rally, we were on our way there, and I got pulled over in my sister’s Renault with 6 or 7 people in the car (it was meant for 4). No ticket — he got a kick out of us.  The one with the broken leg on the floor in the Renault was Carol Barry. One time, I drove home in reverse because our '57 or '58 Mercury was a pushbutton shift, and it got stuck in reverse. And it was snowing — scared me to death!!

I remember "Oil City" burning several times.  We'd all pile in the car and go watch.

I had Artie Heyman in my typing class. Our teacher (Miss Pancoast) would always yell at Artie because his knees were always sticking out in the aisle on either side of his desk.  She'd yell "ARTHURRRRRR, get your knees under the desk;" so he would. Naturally the whole desk, typewriter and all would lift off the floor, as his legs were SO long. She'd tell him to stop playing — so he'd put them back in the aisle — and so forth; back and forth they'd go. Silly story.

Do you remember when we were in sixth grade we were taken to the jr./sr. high school for a tour so that we wouldn't feel uncomfortable in the fall?? I remember so vividly the girls in the halls with their hair in rollers with scarves over their heads, and they were wearing "short shorts." That fall, when we entered jr. high, there was the first dress code in place ― no shorts, no rollers!!

The fall football games, dancing in the cafeteria, Senior Day, “The Whole Experience”

   

 

Kathy Keegan (now deceased) My article for Chat magazine in 9th grade was censored by the faculty after being printed.  It described the personalities of different teachers ― a bad memory but a vivid one.  

A good memory: Sportnight.

    Bill Badalucca: How can any of "Rapp's mathematical delinquents" ever forget that lady. She was one super teacher. I aced the final for math 10, plane geometry, but I was in a hurry and did the graph work in pencil when she wanted it in ink. So she made me do the graph problems over and in my haste to get out of there, I goofed on 7 + and - signs. She took off one point for each goof and I wound up getting a 93.  She told me the following week. Boy was I pissed! But it taught me a lesson I still carry today.
        
   
  (Now deceased)

Marty Fuchs:  Miss Rapp was inspirational. The fact that I went on to get a Master's Degree in Mathematics is due in no small part to her Geometry class and her teaching manner.

I can't for the life of me remember why or how I wound up taking typing. I still hear Miss Pancoast's "'F, type, type, type'; 'D, type, type, type'" when my fingers go into home position. Amazing that this class developed the only skill that would prove so essential in my later life as I spend 8 hours a day for the last 34 years with my fingers on the PC keyboard! While other teachers may have inspired me more, Miss Pancoast did what she was paid to do — she taught me a skill!  God bless her.

And Bells Are Ringing.

   

 

Audrey Schneiderman:  I remember the school plays — Paint Your Wagon, King and I, Bells Are Ringing, Teahouse of the August Moon.  I also remember being in SportNite, singing in chorus and loving school.
  

   

 

Doreen Silverstein:  I have very good memories of Sport Nite.  I remember teaching 100 girls how to dance like penguins, waddling out onto the gym floor. It was so much fun, many great friendships were formed, and the best part is that we won that year.
   

   

Rick von Brook: Angelo Plaia ― Phys. Ed.  Tried to bottom out on the trampoline.  I remember a few times when he came within inches of making it hit the floor. How about Mr. Fetherston and that other biology teacher (Mr. Safer — he drove a Studebaker with an aoogah horn) when they used to come out of the prep room between the labs fencing with pointers. Mr. Waldron was a great guy.

I'll never forget the music teacher in School #5, Miss Deitrich. She taught me to play the drums. A skill I didn't use again until my first year at college.

In the dead of winter, all bundled up, we would get on the buses to go to Long Beach to swim. I don't remember who was with me, but we found an open doorway to the beach one night and went down and waded in the surf in February.  I still remember how surprised I was that the ocean was so warm.

Teahouse of the August Moon was one of my most memorable experiences. I finally got up the nerve to try out for it, and had a fantastic experience. I made a lot of new friends doing the play. They were people I had gone to school with for years, but never got to really know until then.

   



"Pee Wee" Weitzman: 
First thing that comes to mind is wonderful friends many have remained my friends thru the years. I also have flashbacks of wearing skirts with hunting socks. I think this was Jr. High. I remember the adorable English teacher, Mr. Smith. I remember the excitement of Sport Nite. I remember learning to smoke, learning to drive, learning to dance. I suppose I could go on but I will stop here for now.

    Howie Levy:  My favorite memory is not a specific event, events, a teacher or another person. It is the general feeling of being always surrounded by so many wonderful friends, great guys and gals who filled every day with the pleasure of being around thema feeling that has never quite been duplicated in my 40+ years of life since OHS.

And the parties ― I loved the parties, especially when we were seniors and could drive at night. We went from one party to another until there were no more.

   
  (Now deceased)
Lois Rindner Artie Heyman [’59] was in my French class with me and he used to call the teacher "Babes," right to her face. He'd jump up on window ledges, mimicking an ape and threaten to jump out the window. He drove that poor woman crazy. Regardless, I always disliked having to learn French.

We all anticipated and loved Sports Night. I remember we had bowling pin-shaped wooden things that were painted with glow-in-the-dark white paint. They shut off the lights, and the routine was spectacular.  The music they played for that was "A Summer Place."

I remember our sorority sweaters that were gray and green, but I can't remember the name of the sorority. I do remember all of my sorority sisters. Also, what a great bunch of guys in that school. I loved wearing wool, plaid skirts with crew neck sweaters, white bucks with wrinkled-down wool socks. I remember our navy blue pea coats with the zippered hoods. Then at some point, for no apparent reason, we switched to camel’s hair coats. We were so cool, and it was easy living! I loved high school. It was so easy and so much fun (except for Algebra, of course).

I remember School #4. I loved to climb and sit in the trees in the front yard. Alan Lupi moved in across the street from the school on Oceanside Road. He was such a great guy. I also remember Judy Pilgrim who lived across the street from the school yard. Whenever I walked into her house it always smelled like clean fresh ironing. And her mother would give us spice cake, which I had never had before and was so delicious.

    (Now deceased) Ed ChiltonThe Saturday the damn gargoyle was delivered for the Latin Club.

This 1-ton chunk of marble with a hideous face carved thereon was rescued from some building being demolished in NYC. It was lowered by crane onto a flatbed truck and then driven out to OHS.  The only
place a truck could drop off the huge stone was at the back of the school, thus it was lowered to the ground immediately behind the OHS Band Room.  Thud.

On that day, the OHS band was marching, probably for a home football game. We band members were wearing our blue and white, wool uniforms.

For reasons I can't recall, I had also borrowed a gray sweater from my father. The delivery truck was accompanied by a car bearing a reporter and a photographer from Newsday.  They wanted a picture with kids next to the gargoyle so they could go home. Any damn kids.

"Hey, you," they called out to me and explained what they wanted.  I told the journalists I was not a member of the Latin Club. "We do not give a ... we do not care," they said. "Where's a girl?" they asked me.

At that moment Hazel Lotz, class of '61, walked out of the band room dressed in her uniform, including hat with plume.  "Get that hat off," they told her. The photographer arranged me squatting and Hazel bent at the waist looking blankly at the gargoyle, but something was not right in the viewfinder. Finally the photographer told me to take my father's sweater off and told Hazel Lotz to put it on. Whatever, anything to get this over with, click.

And so the OHS historical record must accept that no Latin Club members were around to receive "Peregrinator" which is what they decided to call the thing just two members of the Band.

"E pluribus propter hoc delecti."
   
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Bob Smutny:  I have a memory to share with my fellow classmates of a little known practical joke that was played by a small group of us from the class of 1960, the results of which far exceeded our wildest fantasies.

APRIL FOOL 1960:  One March day in 1960, one of our classmates, who was also a member of the Audio-Visual Squad (I would tell you his name if I remembered it) happened upon a blank teacher evaluation form. That chance discovery gave some of us who also happened to be students of a certain physics teacher an idea. From that idea we hatched a plan to play an April Fools joke on Mr. Pearsall. The evaluation form was filled out giving Mr. Pearsall extremely low ratings. Then the guys handed it over to me to forge the signature of the deceased clerk of the School Board whose name was at the bottom of the form. I balked for a minute, then said to myself "what the hell" and signed it. We put the evaluation into an envelope and wrote Mr. Pearsall's name on it. The real trick was how to get this envelope into his mailbox in the school office.  Fortunately, one of us, Gerry Gutman had unquestioned access to the school office as he operated the school's PA system. On the morning of April 1st, 1960, Gerry put the envelope in Mr. Pearsall's mailbox.

Then we (Mike Blumenthal, Al Carlson, Larry Goldberg, Gerry Gutman and myself) who had classes with Mr. Pearsall that day waited with baited breath. I am not sure what we really expected. Not one word was said, there was no sign of anything unusual. We were baffled.

I don't remember how many days passed before we found out what took place when Mr. Pearsall opened the envelope. Appropriately, it was Gerry who found out first. One of the secretaries in the office told him the story. A few days later I received the same story from Roseann Meybohm who I had confided in. Her parents had one of the teachers boarding at their home. He told the story to the family.

When Mr. Pearsall, read the evaluation was very upset. He immediately went to our principal, Mr. Mosback, who upon reading the evaluation called Superintendent Egdorf. The joke was discovered as Mr. Mosback, was reading the evaluation to Mr. Egdorf. Both sources told us that Mr. Pearsall and Mr. Mosback, were sure the perpetrator of the joke was a teacher. They appear never to have suspected students. We, of course, told no one.

   
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Susan Schlesinger:  Playing Lotus Blossom in Teahouse of the August Moon. I remember the excitement of SportNite. When I ask anyone in school today or even those who went to another school in the 60s if they had a SportNite event similar to ours...most look at me as if I am crazy. It really was like a "Color War"event and very special. Can anyone still sing any of the songs? I also remember dancing (downstairs somewhere ─ the gym??? [In fact, it was the cafeteria.]) during lunch hour at Jr. High School. Amazing. I remember the joy of taking classes such as art, chorus, typing, making a skirt (that I wore for years) in homemaking and also preparing a tuna/cheese casserole (that I have never been able to eat since). I remember the good friends who visited my house instead of going to Hebrew school since I lived just off the Temple's parking lot. I remember the Lido beach clubs' beach parties and picnics. What good times we had. How fortunate we are to have gone to school at that time. 
   
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Bob Johnson:  The classic memory of mine was in 7th grade, and we were in the gym to learn how to dance. The boys were on one line,  and the girls were on the other. We each walked down the side of the gym and then met in the middle with our dance  partner. I was skinny and shy, and I was  paired with Audrey Schneiderman who, at the time, was busting out all over in a new, pointy bra. I held her to me for dear life in fear and also in great joy as we learned to dance. It was an awkward time for both of us, but we weathered it to the end. They were great days.
   
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Bob Santore:  In school, I had great fun with Sue Schlesinger "twanging", Jay Sacks (doin' crazy
stuff), Carol Wohlfarth, who threatened me if I exposed "the film." I wasn't very good in sports, but I did take up wrestling in school. I was too light and skinny (110#) to make the team, and Denis Block pinned me in a wrestling tournament. In track, I was very fast at the 100 yard dash, but they called me crazy legs because mine were slightly bowed. I also tried out for the first intramural lacrosse team, but too many guys were losing their teeth, or breaking shin bones because the school lacked protective equipment. So I opted out. Frank LaBella broke my front tooth in gym, and in boxing; I broke my jaw from a left hook. Other friends were Mike Zammetti, Jean Monteleone, Hale Burrus (we hid his 3 wheeled car in his back yard), Frank Collins, Don Dininno, Doug Fanti, Steve Killorin, Sam "Stove-Pipe" Lettini, Ray Martinis and Donna Fritz. Flirted in class with Betty Tobolson and Carol Crisalli. My closest friends were Carmine Lupo and John Dapolito ('61), Marilyn Seery, Carol Maiorana ('61),  Jeffrey Seltzer, Jay Simon ('62), John Uustall ('59), Max Abbott, Sharon Bauman {'61), Carol Wakefield ('61), Frank Pubins ('61),  Richard Hart and Steve Venter ('61). I dated Linda Strauss, Deloris Ainslie ('61) and Barbara Stanton ('61) OHS Prom. Most cherished moments were playing hookie, spending the day (and night) on the beach with friends; playing baseball and touch football behind our house on Nathan's grass parking lot.
   
  (Now deceased)
Judy Fitzgerald. I remember with fondness enjoying hot dogs and soft-shelled crab sandwiches at Nathan's (sigh). And, who could forget the 'Triangle' with the miniscule police booth, a place where I would seek refuge at night after a school activity while waiting for the bus to take me home to Island Park. Ah, the little Red Store, where we junior high kids would regularly go to get lunch. I remember the proprietors being so tolerant of us kids. Once we were at the splendid new senior high, though, it was a longer walk to the always-mobbed store, so I didn't go there as often, opting for the cafeteria, whose food, generally, was pretty darn good. I remember Mr. Jan patrolling the cafeteria telling us to 'keep the tables clean', and, amusingly, that's just what he wrote in my yearbook. And, oh, who could forget the Towne where we had such great times socializing and dancing. It was good, clean fun!! I used to love dancing with Frank Collins, who was an excellent dancer.

My years at OHS are filled with fond memories, and, while some I knew thought I was nuts, I always felt sad at the end of the school year in June because I knew I wouldn't see a lot of my friends until school re-opened in Sept. When we graduated, I felt especially sad, knowing I probably would never see most of my fellow classmates again.

During the first week of [jr. high] school, I became curious about this boy who was in my English class in the morning and after lunch in my French class. What I couldn't figure out was why he changed his shirt every day at lunchtime. One morning I was standing in the hall by my locker before homeroom when I saw him walk by, when, by golly, several minutes later he walked by again, going in the same direction, wearing a different shirt. Hmmmm, I thought, what's going on???? It was then that I learned Pete and Joe Witteman were identical twins. They were so identical I could not tell them apart.

   
  (Now deceased)

 

Ronna Maislis:  My fondest memories were of my friends in high school. I remember my dear high school friends and my sorority sisters. The football games were exciting and fun.

   
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Ruth Ann Mosback: 
Sharing that time and experience with my father, who had a stroke and retired as principal two years after we graduated.
 
   
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Linda Strauss: 
There are too many good ones to pick out one favorite. It was our whole era — the '50s and the friendships that made it wonderful.
  
   
(Now deceased)
 

Hal WilenskyWinning the Long Island High School Baseball Championship in my Junior Year (1959)

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Karin Nover:
  Junior Class play
 

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Barbara Zimmerman: 
SportNite and our school spirit

 
   
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Barbara Faicco: 
Graduation Day!
    
 
   
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Carol Johnson:
  SportNite, pajama parties, Jahn’s Ice Cream Parlor, lots of school spirit and great friends.

 
   
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Eileen Carlock: 
Attending football, basketball (with Artie Heyman, et al) games — also school theatrical productions
 
   
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Joan Milles: 
SportNite — Some favorite friends
        
 
   
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Mike Brozost: 
Parties, sporting events, prom, graduation
   
   
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Dan Dawson: 
Good times with the track team and naughty times (with Lloyd Becker) in Mr.Voulangas’ world history class
 
   
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Doris Wulbern: 
SportNite

 
   
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Carole Cohen: 
Ice skating on Loft's Lake, SportNite, all the dances, especially the Senior Prom.

  
   
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Vicki Goris: 
SportNite; also singing for Jr. Prom with Carol Johnson, Bev Barnes, Joan Sims ((now deceased).
 
   
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Patti Kuralt: 
  Mr. Fetherston’s biology class.
    
   
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Fran Caporaso: 
Those wonderful leadership weekends out at our principal’s summer compound.
 
   
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Jean Bannwarth:
  Good friends.
      
   
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Janna Barone: 
Art classes.
 
   
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Bill Liebman: 
Bonding with fraternity brothers and having my own “wheels.”
 
   
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John "Cochise" Cachianes: 
Football, track and good friends.
 
   
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Connie Baumann:  SportNite.

   
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Bob Sewall: Being a mid-year junior transfer, my favorite OHS memory was graduation.

   
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Linda Krumenacker:  Graduation day itself!

   
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Ginny Beedenbender:  Sportnight, Friday night, basketball games and sorority get togethers.  

   
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Elaine Castronovo:  Sport Nite, Teen Center.

   
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Judy Krull:  Cutting class with Arlene Weiser and  Linda Kepke.

   
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Arlene Neubeck:  Graduation.

   
  (Now deceased)
 

Mike KatzMy classmates.

   
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Ginny Matthews:  SportNite.

   
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Eleanor Sicari:  SportNite    

   
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Pat Bedell:  The wonderful times spent with the girls in Alpha Omega.

   
 (Now deceased)
 

Bette Tobolson:  Fun with good friends, Drill Team, SportNite, dances and the prom.

   
  (Now deceased)


Don FineFrank Mangiapane. He was a class act from start to finish, and I have yet to meet anyone better.

 
   
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Barbara Thompson: Mr. Korn’s English class

   
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Sabin Danziger:  Graduation.

   
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Frank Pasqualino:  Scoring the winning touchdown against Baldwin High

   
  (Now deceased)
 

Steve Killorin:  Winning two NY State Championships and being awarded a full scholarship to Syracuse University.
 

   
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Dolores Mortensen:  SportNite.

   
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Lloyd Becker:  Impromptu “warm ups” of World History with Dan Dawson..

   
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Marta Watts: 
SportNite; night football games; terrific theatrical productions; Roadside Rest; Miss Sullivan’s English class; lasting friendships.
 
   
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Penny White: 
SportNite, being crowned “May Queen” and the 1959 basketball final, Baldwin vs. Oceanside.
 
   
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Dan Colodner: 
Miss Sullivan’s English classes, Mr. Sobel’s History class, playing on the school tennis team.

   
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Brenda Gordon:  Senior prom.

   
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Fran Renzi:  My nice friends.

   
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Gail Fogelberg:  Sabin Danziger always made me laugh.  

   
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Bill Schmidt:  Drivers' Ed with Angie Plaia, soccer team with Art Wright.

   
  (Now deceased)
 

David AdestSchool plays, school store ("Sailor Shop").

   
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Betty Griffin: 
Biology class with Mr. Eckhoff especially when Mr. Fetherston would arrive for a duel on the lab table.
 
   
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Richard Marcus: 
Watching Artie Heyman play basketball.
    
   
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Bobbie AIfin:  Going to the basketball games with all my friends.

   
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Michael Perlman:  Hanging around with Max, David and Austin

   

 

Helaine Carlin:  Being invited to the 1957 Senior Prom as a ninth grader. Laughing and eating dog food on Hell Night for my sorority, Phi Kappa Lambda.
 

   
  (Now deceased)

Fran Hulse: 
The yearly SportNite activities.


   
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Ruth Harvey
SportNite, physics teacher and physics class, homerooms.
    
 
   
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Peggy Bogosian: Getting 100 on the solid geometry Regents exam.

   
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Jeanie Bomberg: 
Meeting my best and longest friend, Maureen Beers.
 
   
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George Pearson: 
Playing HS baseball.

 
   
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Jack Beaulieu:  Being a part of Girls' SportNite.

   
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George Kinney:  Graduation.

   
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Bobbie Deitch:  Leaving school (I didn’t like school). I did like SportNite, however.

   
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Carole Greenstein:  Friends, sleepover parties, the Jr. and Sr. proms, the great music. 

   
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Bob Harrigan:  All of it.

   
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Linda Luschinski:  My best memory of school lunches was dancing in the cafeteria.

   
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Pete Wittemann:  Summers in Oceanside and how many of us hitched to Island Park and Long Beach to hit the beaches. 
 

   
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Joe Wittemann:  I remember it as a bittersweet time — good and some not so good.  But it was a wonderful place to grow up — so when do we do the movie?
 

   
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Mary Ann Acierno. I lived right on Oceanside Road next to Temple Avodah. I can still remember how pretty Oceanside Rd. was in the spring and summer; the trees kind of covered the road overhead — you know like the feeling of a covered bridge, so-o-o-o pretty — and peaceful too.
 

   


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Dave Cooper. My fondest memories are from the years, 1958-'60, with Ed Chilton [now deceased] and Dennis Deegan having fun at school and hanging out at the beach together during the summer. They really were pivotal moments in my life!
   

See more memories in our 55-Year Reunion Program Booklet and
at
Feedback Received From our classmates.

     

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